People say many things about Guinness’ advertising campaigns, most of the times the words that describe those campaigns are superlatives. They are simply impressive. As you probably know, Guinness is a premium beer, which should mean that is not just for everybody and that’s why some of the ads have a little twitch, an idea that you have to think about it, not just the simple message blown in your face.

The story

It all starts with just one man, but it’s not down to a single ‘eureka’ moment. The history of GUINNESS® is a stirring tale of inspiration, dedication, ingenuity and effort. It’s over two centuries of sublime brewing craft, a remarkable knack for spreading the word and more than a few leaps of faith. It’s the story of how a unique Irish stout became, with a little magic, one of the World’s best-loved beers.

Guinness is a popular Irish dry stout that originated in the brewery of Arthur Guinness (1725–1803) at St. James’s Gate, Dublin. Guinness is directly descended from the porter style that originated in London in the early 18th century and is one of the most successful beer brands worldwide.

A distinctive feature is the burnt flavour which is derived from the use of roasted unmalted barley (though this is a relatively modern development since it did not become a part of the grist until well into the 20th century). For many years a portion of aged brew was blended with freshly brewed product to give a sharp lactic flavour (which was a characteristic of the original Porter).

The company had its headquarters in London from 1932 onwards. It merged with Grand Metropolitan plc in 1997 and then figured in the development of the multi-national alcohol conglomerate Diageo.

Pint of Guinness

Studies claim that Guinness can be beneficial to the heart. Researchers found that antioxidant compounds in Guinness, similar to those found in certain fruits and vegetables, are responsible for health benefits because they slow down the deposit of harmful cholesterol on the artery walls.

Guinness ran an advertising campaign in the 1920s which stemmed from market research – when people told the company that they felt good after their pint, the slogan was born – “Guinness is Good for You”. This type of advertising for alcoholic drinks that implies improved physical performance or enhanced personal qualities is now prohibited in Ireland. Diageo, the company that now manufactures Guinness, now says: “We never make any medical claims for our drinks.”

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